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Elapsed Time

Learn to derive elapsed time

Price: iPhone/iPad - Paid

Teacher Overview

‘Elapsed time’ is a unique application that is aimed at primary school aged children and provides an exploratory environment that teaches them how to work out elapsed time. It contains two learning environments: Daily Activities and Elapsed Time. In both environments the app synchronises a changing background and daily events with a clock and a timeline to give a child the impression of time moving through the day. This app is free from in-app purchases and in-app adverts, and it is available for iPad and Windows. 

Teacher Review

Upon opening the application, the user is greeted with the developer’s splash screen followed by the main ‘Home Page’. There are a number of options available on the ‘Home Page’ such as an option to turn the Sound/Audio narration ‘on or off’ and an ‘Options’ button for the play modes. The page displays the current time and a street graphic in the centre of the display. The sound is wonderful and certainly creates an atmosphere of ‘Time’. 

The application offers two learning environments.

Daily Activities:

In this environment a child is presented with a number of daily events (breakfast, start school etc.) from which they are invited to choose a start event and an end event. They then observe how elapsed time changes as the scene slowly transitions between their chosen events. The intention of this scene is to acquaint the child with the idea of elapsed time and how it relates to activities they’ll be very familiar with. The child’s narration is delightful and warming.

Elapsed Time:

The child selects a start time and an end time and then observes how the elapsed time changes as they move a ‘current time’ button along a timeline. The technique presented in this scene is very similar to how the child is taught elapsed time in the classroom and so they can repeat the learning process at their own pace and without fear of making mistakes.

Once opted for the ‘Daily Activities’ the child is prompted by the on screen instructions. The child’s narration is delightful and warming and great for those who struggle with reading. The child is asked to choose a starting activity such as ‘Breakfast’ and then drag this icon to the time line. There are instructions to move the event until the flashing arrow covers the notch above the chosen time. Our younger users found this relatively intuitive to find the correct time.  Once the ‘start Activity’ has been located the child is asked to add an ‘end activity’. Once found the graphical interface and the clock displays showing how time elapsed throughout these events. There are a number of ‘options’ displayed here such as ‘Start Again’, ‘Return’ and ‘Play’. Pressing the ‘Play’ will activate the animation to show what is happening throughout the day. The graphics are wonderful and engaging, however, they can be rather confusing if there are areas on the timeline without activities as the graphics tend to run in a loop with very little continuity. We also noted that adding more than two or three activities within the timeline sets the timeline into the next phase. We would like to see all activities within the timeline. The developers may also consider the users own ‘

Wake up’ time or ‘Breakfast’ in this mode as some of our users wanted to place the event on the timeline according to their own routine.

Children will enjoy the fact that they can explore the timeline with different actions and that there is no right or wrong answer. This is great for differentiation within the classroom.

Opting for the game mode ‘Elapsed Time’ Mode the child is prompted by the on screen instructions. They can choose between time units of 0, 15 and 30 minutes. The clock can be set to a given ‘Start time’ and then set to an ‘End time’ which is very user friendly. Once this has been completed they are asked to move the ‘blue arrow’ to the start of the timeline. The arrow can be moved along the timeline within the chosen time units with the application displaying the time elapsed. The time line displays the time elapsed using some lovely graphics that bounce along the time line. This was certainly our preferred mode but the developers should consider adding Activities to this section for the child to set their time too. Again in this play mode there is a delightful childlike narration.

This application certainly has some educational value for teaching elapsed time within Maths and as a life skill. Parents and teachers would certainly need to assist the child with the application but once the initial concept has been shown they should be able to explore the application on their own.

Elapsed time is a good application that is pleasing to the eye and engaging. The recent updates within the application have improved the user experience. This application comes recommended by the EducationalAppstore.com

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Teacher Certification

Teacher Rating for the appTeacher Rating

Subject Category of the appSubjects

App Advertising or In-App PurchasesSafeguarding

In-App Purchases - No

In-App Advertising - No

Screenshots

  • Elapsed Time App - 1Elapsed Time App - 2Elapsed Time App - 3Elapsed Time App - 4

Developer Description

This app contains two learning environments: Daily Activities and Elapsed Time. In both environments the app synchronises a changing background and daily events with a clock and a timeline to give a child the impression of time moving through the day.

Daily Activities: In this environment a child is presented with a number of daily events (breakfast, start school etc) from which they are invited to choose a start event and an end event. They then observe how elapsed time changes as the scene slowly transitions between their chosen events. The intention of this scene is to acquaint the child with the idea of elapsed time and how it relates to activities they’ll be very familiar with.

Elapsed Time: A child selects a start time and an end time and then observes how the elapsed time changes as they move a ‘current time’ button along a timeline. The technique presented in this scene is very similar to how the child is taught elapsed time in the classroom and so they can repeat the learning process at their own pace and without fear of making mistakes.

Read More Less